Monday, November 23, 2009

Top lit Equine

Kitty Wallis says one of the biggest problems she sees in her workshops is not-dark-enough flesh tones values in portraits. She told me it is sometimes hard to convince people that light obects are really not light under certain lighting situations. I reminded myself of her lesson while I painted this..and even though this is a horse, not a person, principles pertaining to value are the same. If the painter thinks ahead they will choose the correct values (and go dark enough). When painting something white we have to reserve the whitest white for only a couple of places..otherwise we will have one big chalk-y deal. We have to be deliberate! Be decisive..and go dark enough in shadowed areas--even when the local color is very light.
I will revisit my white horse in the days ahead and straighten out a couple of things. He is off to a good start!

12 comments:

Dale Sherman Blodget said...

Hi Celeste,
Your white horse is very sweet looking. Do you know what breed he is? Looking forward to updates, although he could even be done....

Celeste Vaught said...

This caught my eye as the thumbnail - I agree, I think he could be done! Very charming.

ArtSparker said...

There's almost a depth of field thing going on here, with the neck fading out of focus.

Katherine van Schoonhoven said...

Beautiful values -- they read just right and your horse has lots of personality.

Sheila said...

ooo...more good advise... thank you. What could you do to improve this beautiful image? -asks the novice to the master....

Gregory Becker said...

I think of Rembrandt and how his paintings must've looked right before he put in those carefully placed lights. It may be that a domino effect takes place when the lightest light is put in causing all of the other values to fall into place. It may be that our work doesn't even make sense until the lights or darks are put in. It seems to me that in most cases the use of a full value range depends more upon distribution that anything else. In other words...How much of certain values we use and where causes the picture to look this way or that.
Beautiful horse Celeste

Kerri Settle said...

I think it reads as a complete painting as-is. I love the looser looking strokes for the hair; it really makes a statement!

Caio Fernandes said...

don't even need to post this comment if you don't want to .
Celeste .....
i have noticed in USA , have so many theorys and people teaching how to paint this , that , so many rules and formulas and "knoleges" . isn't easier to say " be faithul to your eyes " ..?
i believe this rule substitute all the others .
sure i have tried to say this for some people on internet , but they got very upset with me , for someones it takes their "importance " away , for others i saw they are very unsecure about to paint .
both are so not your case .
because i see you have a very wise eye , a instinctive one .
what you saw on my painting yesterday , for example , any one of those "teachers - formula- tip holders " wouldn't be able to see . they just don't get . i say this for experience . they are really afraid of this kind of things and solutions .
and the works you do . i notice these weeks i have following your blog , you don't have a formula of how to build the image . you really see and do it .
today i have followed 2 kinds of blogs about painting . the ones i admire , as your sure . and the ones i need to read , the "paint lessons" ones , for to know everything i have to forget or scape .
a believe that this attitude of to breed rules , to invent knoleges , that isn't new , always existed in painting history , today has being the main problem for figurative painters like me in the contemporary art market . they really give reason for the "instalation and digital photogaph " kind of fashion people attack painting and say it is dead . i can argue with then , but it gets harder when there is somuch books and blogs and classes with people ( mediocre people , for a weird coincidence ) saying how to use the white , how to paint the sky in a autum landscape , how to do that shine in a class cup .............
and i say this with sadness in my heart because i love so much the realism and Hipper-realism created in north america in the 20th centure . it is unique , americans have a diferent way to see realit , a diferent concept of it . making so many exelent works . so many great names appeared . but even this is going to die , or get less importance on the world art history , if these rulers start to make their voices get so present .


this horse is very good . the fact you want to improve it is because you aren't a mediocre . painters are never totaly satisfied .

Celeste Bergin said...

Thank you Dale, Celeste, Susan, Sheila, Kvan, Gregory, Caio and Kerri..! I sincerely appreciate your comments. The best part about having a blog is that people see things I don't see..and/or they tell me that something is finished--as this is. There are just a couple edges to address. I am grateful you're having a look at what I do and giving me your thoughts about it. I think about painters of yesteryear..(particularly the 60's) No internet! They operated in isolation. Poor people. lol. Thanks again for the "discussion". Caio, I understand completely what you meant. I am fortunate that all my mentors do not teach "formula" ..they make us (the students) bump along with the basic tenants of art fundamentals...the ones artists have used since time immortal. But, they don't "Bob Ross" us. I do understand your position..that too much information about technique will remove the "heart". You'll never have to worry about that..ever!. I am NEARLY impervious to slings and arrows. I can learn technique and not go overboard and kill my heart. lol. I love all your work. You're all outstanding artists!

C
Thanks again everyone--!!

Karen said...

A much needed reminder for me...your timing is good. :) The white here is perfect; it surely reads as that he's in sun.

Kitty Wallis said...

Sweet! like warm snow. I don't know horses, but feel happy to see this young one's pretty face.

-Don said...

It's not just the values - it's the color you use in those values and how they react to the "world" around them. In this lovely piece the orange in the background makes the blues in the "white" work perfectly. Great job...great post. -Don