Wednesday, December 29, 2010

To suggest


I saw an episode of Passport & Palette on PBS today. Kenn Backhaus painted a mountain in Switerland..(and it was superb, of course). One thing he said during this episode is something I have been working on recently. Kenn said (I'm paraphrasing): "Paint to the intelligence of the viewer, let them participate in the painting". I am certain what he means is that most viewers don't need to have things "over-explained", a suggestion is all that is necessary--that way the viewer gets to finish the painting themselves. This painting is a study...I may do another version (with more detail and color) in the future.
Oil Study: Celeste Bergin, Rain in the city , 9 x 12, oil on canvas panel

15 comments:

Pam Holnback said...

I've seen several of the P & Ps on tv. i need to get a schedule to remind myself when they're on. love the looseness of this one.

Nancy Van Blaricom said...

I saw the same episode. I think your are right. You explain it perfectly. What a great example your painting painting is of those words.

Alina Chau said...

beautiful!!

B Boylan said...

I LOVE your rain scenes! Oh so Portland of course!

-Don said...

I like that you let me 'finish' your work. It makes me a part of a beautiful thing...

-Don

Katherine van Schoonhoven said...

Nice! I like your umbrella scenes! It's a great subject for light reflections on wet surfaces, people huddled under brightly colored fabric, and everything misty and not so defined. I like the mood and how you've captured the sense between the two figures.

ArtSparker said...

Can't resist your paintings with umbrellas.

martinealison said...

Je me surprends en aimant votre série "pluvieuse", moi qui n'aime pas la pluie!!!
Vous êtes une ensorceleuse ma chère Céleste...
Gros bisous

Stephen Parker said...

Love the simple shapes and sense of light in your street scene study.

Re: Passport & Pallet, I agree totally. Leaving something for the viewer to complete was one of the most repeated mantras drilled into our heads as young creatives in the ad industry. Unfortunately, too few corporate clients seem to have been enlightened by the same wisdom.

billspaintingmn said...

Very nice! In advertizing we called it subliminal inbeds. Funny, I'm craving a drink of water!

hwfarber said...

I looked at this earlier and thought both figures were facing right--I thought they were window shopping. I'm awake now and see that they're facing each other. If I participate in the painting I can have the figure on the right face either way--sort of like the spinning figure test. Interesting.

Linda Popple said...

There is such a wonderful, moody atmosphere in this painting. So beautiful, Celeste!

We don't get P & P here - I've contacted our PBS station twice to request it. Hopefully, some day it will come.

Happy New Year!

Dan Kent said...

I never heard of P & P - thanks! I'll have to check it out. I like what you say about painting, and I believe it to be true, and I'd say you have the knack. I always look forward to your rain paintings - the colors, the atmosphere - all of these are apparent, but I was sitting with a copy of yesterday's post printed out from my computer and what was readily apparent in black and white were the stark value differences that are so effective in your paintings. The face of your thin umbrella lady was black - very dark. I did a small pen sketch next to it, copying your values. I have learned something (that intellectually I supposedly already knew). Thanks again.

Kitty Wallis said...

Nice one! I like the pink and blue purse. So right with the slight blue light on the other figure. Makes the whole thing real

loriann said...

Words of wisdom you share Celeste. Thanks for paraphrasing. Mystery and beauty. Happy New Year!