Sunday, December 5, 2010

Tea Time...Part Deux!

Today when I went to dive into applying color over my black and white underpainting, I remembered that I haven't always been crazy about painting over black gesso. Black gesso has a weird texture, so I decided to counteract the dry grittiness by slathering poppy oil over the entire surface prior to applying color. The addition of the all over oil made painting on top of the dry underpainting more like painting wet-into-wet (like I am accustomed to). In the end, I think this was a successful experiment..certainly it helped to have the underpainting for a perfect "blueprint plan".
P.S. I also learned when I took the painting off the easel that cad red looks an awful lot like blood on skin! (It seems identical in color). I don't use gloves to protect my skin..but I do use this barrier cream by Winsor Newton.

Painting: Celeste Bergin, Tea time, Oil on 12 x 12 canvas panel



17 comments:

hwfarber said...

Oh, this is stunning. Looks so delicate and I love the colors.

Linda Popple said...

I like your tea cup - very dramatic with the red background. Yes, I think it was a very successful experiment.

Carrie H. said...

I saw the picture of your fingers and thought you cut yourself. Thank goodness it's only paint. Love the T-cup.

Peggy Stermer-Cox said...

Hi Celeste, The colors are lush! I like the way they hint at the detail of the ornamentation on the cup and saucer. And, the red makes me think of a wonderful cup of hot tea!

lancelonie said...

The colors look wonderful! You did well as always, Celeste! :)

-Don said...

Excellent job! You captured the essence of this china beautifully.

Great idea to 'juice up' your black gesso. I'll admit that the texture of the black gesso is what makes it a favorite of mine - especially when using my palette knife to paint. I love the way it 'grabs' the paint. Also, I just love starting with that black surface.

I recently experimented with Clear Gesso over my Schmeerings paintings. It has a similar tooth which has taken a little getting used to since I try to use delicate brushstrokes on those.

-Don

Katherine van Schoonhoven said...

LOVE it!!

billspaintingmn said...

WOW! This really surprized me! I mean I did not expect, or "see" this in the black & white piece. I'm amazed Celeste!
Now I've got to try...

martinealison said...

Le résultat est là sous mes yeux : concluant. Une tasse et sa soucoupe crée avec toute la délicatesse pour de la porcelaine (et ce n'est pas une petite affaire!). Les motifs ont de très belles nuances. Moi, qui fonctionne comme une vieille dame anglaise... thé, thé et encore thé le long de la journée, je m'invite pour un tea for two volontiers ma chère Céleste ainsi que pour un partage artistique.
Bisous

Susan Roux said...

I like your experiment. It came out very well. Your choice of red for the background is lovely. Isn't it fun to get out of our comfort zone? It shakes things up a bit and makes us think differently.

rajasekharan said...

wow...lovely

RHCarpenter said...

Beautiful finish, so delicate. I am learning a bit about oil painting just from watching your work - didn't know about black gesso as an underpainting! Be careful of that cad on your skin!!

Robin said...

I love the way the light sparkles. This tea cup looks sensuous, sleek, and inviting... never thought of a tea cup that way before.

Kathy said...

Your grisaille is well-rendered and when I do mine, I typically use acrylic paints rather than Gesso. The oils adhere well to the acrylic. Your final painting is gorgeous! You really captured the delicacy of the china and light hitting the rim. Perfect !!

ArtSparker said...

Lovely image, very dramatic.

Kitty Wallis said...

What a fine piece! I love it! I worried that the black and white grisaille would hamper the painting with a cold, grim feeling I often see when painters use a black underpainting.
Your color Sings.

Chris said...

love this! Poppy oil-always learning something new on your blog.