Friday, September 23, 2011

Friday!

Today I got to have a long conversation with one of my art friends about the zones of color in the human figure. Now, this is not just any art friend...he's an exemplary artist. (I'd tell you expressly who he is, but I'm concerned he could get bombarded with requests for lessons and he's not someone who teaches. I'm not sure why that is...he's good at it!)  Well, he took a lot of time today, reminding me that there are distinct areas of the face and body that receive more blood than other places and that it is mandatory to play temperatures off one another. The biggest thing I took away from the discussion was that there is a lot of neutral (or gray) in the face...but many are guilty of using too much "flesh-color". While I was at his studio I painted a portrait from a photo, and when I got home I did another, mindful of what we discussed. A productive day!

Painting, Celeste Bergin, Practice portrait #2, oil on 11x14 canvas panel

17 comments:

Jenny Schouten Short said...

That is a good point. BEautiful portrait. You can also use complements on top of or next to each other to create the grays. Lots of red in the ears and purples around the sides of the face. The eyes have green and blues in the skin around them. Just a passing thought. xo Jenny

Sadami said...

Dear Celeste,
Very lovely work! Thank you for the info. I believe ultimately your love for figures makes successful colours.
Cheers,Sadami

Sharon Wright said...

Excellent, very compelling features.

Jane said...

This is gorgeous, but the portraits you did before 'the lesson' are all gorgeous too, so probably your just learned more about something you already knew :-)

Virginia Floyd said...

Beautiful job on the eyes, Celeste.

AutumnLeaves said...

She is so very beautiful!

Susan Roux said...

Sounds like a very productive day! Don't you just love getting real helpful information that's clear and precise. You can take it and put it to good use instantly! It's been my exact experience with Don Hatfield. Clear, precise and easy to understand. (I'd bleed your friend for more info...) Very nice work, Celeste.

billspaintingmn said...

Celeste! Your portraits have great
expression.
The temperatures add to the drama.

The eyes, nose, lips play off that bit of blue on the neck.

A very attractive painting!

Casey Klahn said...

You have a great community of artists in Portland.

Dave Starr said...

I am envious of this nice friendship you have with someone who is willing to just share what they know without making you sign away your life in classes. How do you develop a friendship like that? REally good portrait.

Dave Starr said...

"too much flesh-color" *raises hand*

Ignatz said...

This is perfect. overwhelming!
But do not say surprised. because every time I come to your blog, I see excellent works.
words, amazing, great, or perfect, are not words I can use to talk about your work, it would be a redundancy. I must find new words to return :)
Hugs

hw (hallie) farber said...

Yes, Freud's people are mostly gray, and I believe Gurney mentioned it in his book, Color and Light. Beautiful portrait--she looks a bit like you.

Dean H. said...

Excellent likeness, Celeste! All friends are wonderful...but friends who are willing to take the time to truly share are Miracles!
Many moons ago, my first college painting instructor explained about the same thing to me... areas with more or less blood supply have warmer of cooler colors.

Carolyn Rondthaler said...

I like this, Celeste, and like the teachings. The flow of blood is a legitimate concern for the artist. I am working on a small study of Joan Baez and it has given me a pause for thought.

Kim said...

Thanks for the quick lesson/reminder Celeste. It's a beautiful piece! You've got me wanting to paint portraits ; )

Dan Gliubizzi said...

Hi, Celeste, Thanks for stopping by. My friend Chas Martin said he just met the real you. I look forward to that.

Real nicely painted head which is always the really goal! Your conversations about color reminded me of meeting Myron Barnstone (Google) and what he teaches. I learned much just sitting across to table listing to him tell me about color keyed palets and estalbishing the tone before the first brushstroke ever hits the canvas.
I have never had the patience to acheive this and usually rush in with the first nurdle of paint can sqeeze out!