Sunday, February 17, 2013

Sunday!

I've been intrigued by Julie Ford Oliver's "fracturing" technique. I checked it out at the Daily Paintworks tutorials HERE.  I have been trying it out for a couple of days with some success here and there....but it's certainly not as easy as it looks and I've had a heck of a time not taking off too much paint whilst I "fracture". About the best result I've managed was over an old painting (above). I added and took away paint, with a palette knife and other tools she recommends.

....But the point, of course, of her video is to "fracture" a new painting, not an old one. Julie suggests you try the technique with something you are comfortable painting. So, I made up this red chair and then proceeded to wack away at it (fracturing). I left it here, even though it is not anything like her final results. I think her way of doing things is a great idea for loosening up...and maybe destroying in order to build. I'll have to practice more to get the hang of not taking off too much paint---that's a challenge.  I kind of appreciated this in the end...it seems like it's raining tulips on my made up red chair. (Update: I revisited the chair later, see it HERE).

This weekend I got to watch Craig Srebnik's portrait-from-photo demonstration at his home studio. He talks a streak while he paints, never loses his concentration and in no time BLAM...!..behold a beautiful and interesting painting. See it HERE.

(Top Photo) Painting: Celeste Bergin, Red Tea Pot, oil on 8x8 canvas panel
(Bottom Photo) Painting: Celeste Bergin, Red Chair, oil on 6x6 canvas panel


12 comments:

Polly Birchall said...

I love her technique too. The red teapot is a lovely painting, and you look like you had fun fracturing.

Sheryl Anthony said...

raining tulips, that's funny! I agree, both paintings are captivating.

CrimsonLeaves said...

I like both pieces but admit that teapot is my favorite of the two. I think it is the joyful colors and how much it reminds me of Christmas!

Katharine A. Cartwright said...

Fracturing is a very interesing technique and I like the results. I think what's really cool about it is that it allows the idiosyncratic mark making to come through and, therefore, give us greater insight into the mind of the artist. Neat!!

David Starr said...

I had to laugh about wacking the chair. You're right, the result doesn't look like her work, but the chair painting is righteous! I'd hang it up.

AK said...

Both the works are lovely. Have fun with the new technique.

Julie Ford Oliver said...

This is really wonderful to see you shake up your comfort level and I can see that anything you take away from the fracturing will add to your art vision as you are such a fabulous painter.
The chair is wonderful and so is the more refined red teapot.
You are a generous and supportive art friend.

art by Michael Perchard said...

Celeste! Love! Love! Love!
The red tea pot! Has to be the best red ever!
Great art here!
Michael (Nice to have power and be back online!)

hmuxo said...

Congratulations, Celeste...love this piece...Fracturing doesn't look easy at all...but you did an incredible job!!

SamArtDog said...

Both are delicious, but the chair is outstanding!

Dan Kent said...

This is very fascinating. And you reminded me of her blog which I had been to before. I think that my acquisition of the little rubber sculpting tool which looks like a spatula was a direct result of watching her free film on the tool she made, and I have had some good results with it (one of which I will be posting soon - it is just too big to scan.) I enjoy it more than palette knives, but I haven't used either much. I saw your post yesterday and really like the chair so much better today, so you are moving in the right direction with the technique. It looks great. I love the way you continue to explore different ways of painting - all of this informs your work over time, I am sure.

Bruce Bingham said...

I really love the red chair just like this, it's so fun and free. A also like what you did later. Thanks for sharing Craig's demo, I'm such a fan of his work.