Thursday, November 5, 2015

Thursday!


Hi Friends! I haven't been blogging for awhile.... I have been working a little on my studio and getting ready for winter. 

The photos in today's post are just what they look like. I finally ditched some of my worst paintings that were taking up valuable space. I posted these photos on Facebook and got some flack for it. People tend to think of this as sad or wasteful. Whenever you post something on Facebook there is a reliable legion of people who want to tell you what you are doing wrong.

This idea (to burn paintings) has been in my mind for a long time, ever since I read that an artist I admire made a practice of this. Today's art discussion meeting's topic was "What one thing did you do over the past year that made you a better painter"? My answer was "destroying paintings that currently serve no purpose"! (Really, if you have been painting for awhile and not yet gotten rid of things, you might consider doing it..it is a liberating decision).

To see what everyone brought to today's meeting, go HERE.

Well, I'm excited about painting this winter....are you? I will go check your blogs now. :)

18 comments:

Sadami said...

Celeste, take it easy. We do not live in a 'past and there'. I live in 'now and here' and to the 'future'. Best wishes, Sadami

Julie Ford Oliver said...

I understand and applaud you for doing it.
I put roof tar over my panels because you cannot burn in city limits here.
I have seen too many artists pass on and their families put everything out for the world to see, and I know they were only kept for maybe paint over or correct. Why roof tar...I I previously poured house paint over them until someone fished a couple of mine out of the garbage to use thinking they were abstracts . That Tar is good stuff!
Good to see you posting.

Mike Rafter said...

I agree that it is liberating getting rid of paintings that don't work and will never work. It forces you to evaluate your painting with a more critical eye and learn from your mistakes. Besides, the studio is usually so untidy and I could do with some extra space. I keep the wooden stretchers though and cover them with new canvas.

John Simlett said...

Welcome Back!

SSSssssmmmmooookkkiiinngggggggggg!

Jim Serrett said...

You may have done that wrong, it requires at least one bottle of wine.

Sheryl Anthony said...

I'm one of those who cringing a little about this. I bet you burned things that could have been salvaged. But, I respect your right to do what you want with your work. I don't have enough of a stockpile of work to be discerning yet. Thanks for sharing.

Candace X. Moore said...

Hi, Celeste. I have to chime in on this one, too. We all have our opinions, and this is mine. It would be pretty incredible if every piece you painted was a masterpiece worth saving. Not how it works. If you don't have lots of bad, burn-worthy pieces you're not trying hard enough.

Btw that first photo of the fire would make a cool painting. Intriguing :D

Gary L. Everest said...

Hi Celeste,
Bravo! Nothing quite as satisfying as ditching hopeless paintings. I use a razor knife and slash them up, causing the many layers of cracked paint to go flying in every direction. It's a reminder of all the resources wasted in the attempt to salvage a bad composition.
Have a good weekend in that now roomy studio!
Sincerely,
Gary.

Helen Moreda said...

Good job Celeste. I also destroy old work that should no longer be around. It is very freeing.

Pam Huggins said...

Yay! I was thinking about you- so glad to see you back in the blogosphere.

Burn 'em baby, burn 'em! I do the same thing every now and then... get rid of the crap. It's cleansing. Why hang on to something that only drags you down?

Hard for me to believe anyone could find fault in that... but that's just me.

Love your work! Love your energy! Love your ability to be YOU!!!

Aquarelles Nature said...

I understand very well. Myself, I often go through my portfolios and tear to pieces some aged watercolours that does not deserve a second glance.
Happy weekend. Helene

L.W.Roth, said...

Unfortunately, burning anything outdoors is prohibited in my neighborhood. That's too bad, for trashing a panting still leaves the possibility of it coming back to haunt me! Good for you!

Brenda Boylan said...

Wished I could have joined you in the party. I have enough art fuel to burn down a city. Betting a weight was lifted off your shoulders too.

Quin Sweetman said...

I applaud you, Celeste! You paint beautiful work but it comes from inside you and the best is yet to come, right? I couldn't burn mine but I will do a mass sanding/new base-layer painting session soon ... and I'll picture the old ones burning. Thanks for the inspiration!

Lisa Graham Art said...

Hi Celeste! It's so nice to be on your blog! And good for you for doing what you needed to. I haven't burned paintings yet...but I know the day is coming. I have painted over a few acrylic paintings though.

You're right...lots of opinions on Facebook. :)

Hope you enjoy your clean studio and feel inspired to make a lot of beautiful pieces. Hugs.

art by Michael Perchard said...

Good for you Celeste! I haven't been posting or commenting for a while either!! Once I destroyed some huge steel sculptures! Not sure why I did it but it was very satisfying! All the best Michael

http://carolking.wordpress.com said...

Good for you. Out with the old! Make way for the new.

Mary Jane Muir said...

Hi Celeste- I have missed your posts lately. I thought I'd come by tonight to see what you are up to. Wow! Burning paintings that didn't work out is a really interesting and inspiring idea. And brave! Looking forward to seeing your new paintings this winter.